Fly Fishing Instruction In Vail

Driving down Cross Creek Road past the Minturn Middle School early last Saturday morning, I saw two teens in the parking lot, practicing fly fishing casts. I had to pull over and watch. This is exactly what I did to hone basic skills many (so many) years ago!

 

kids-fly-fishing-coloradoLearning to fly cast has a steep learning curve. Being successful in fly fishing depends on skill and ability, and on coordination and good reflexes. Even basic casting takes practice to “get it right”, to precisely control the placement of the fly. Mastering more advanced techniques like a roll cast, curve cast or a double haul takes even more practice.

I just had to get out and talk to these budding fly fishers. It certainly looked as if they were enthusiastic. And I was right. They were beginners, trying to build up some field experience before actually taking part next weekend in an intensive two day workshop for beginner fly anglers. They both had already signed up with Minturn Anglers here in town.

They told me the first day is classroom oriented and held at the Minturn Vail fly fishing Village location in the Solaris shopping center. The day is spent discussing equipment basics, reading water and identifying fish habitat, matching flies to hatches and stream conditions, basic knots and riggings, as well as the basics of the fly cast. The next day moves out from the Minturn Anglers location providing the best fly fishing Vail has to offer. With no more than three students per guide, the techniques discussed the previous day are put into practice.

I told them they were taking the right approach. Whether trying to increase cast accuracy, lengthen casts, avoid tailing loops or learning more complex casts, the suggestions and guidance offered by a professional fly fisherman are invaluable. With practice, even beginners will quickly learn to coordinate eyes and the entire body to control rod movement and cast the line and leader and the fly to a precise location.

Learning the basic or standard cast is just the beginning, as different casting techniques are suited to different water conditions. For example, the false cast is used to increase distance, or a roll cast is used when wind is interfering with back casting. Curve casting, reach casting, and serpentine casting are other approaches that have challenged me over the years. I only mentioned this to my new friends to remind them that they were beginning a journey that would provide years of enjoyment and challenge in learning new skills. I wished them an enjoyable time next weekend, and years of Colorado fly fishing pleasure. Their smiles told me they were ready!

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